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Full text of "Annual report of the Division of Immigration and Americanization"


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GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS 

DEPARTMENT 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 




DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 



FORTY 



SEVENTH 



A;N N UAL REPORT 
July 1, 1963 - June 30, 1964 






THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
Dr. Owen B. Kiernan - Commissioner 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 
Mrs. Teofilia K. Tattan - Supervisor of Social Service 



BOARD OF THE DIVISION OF MIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

Term Expires 

1966 Mrs. Gemma Valenti - Medford Chairman 

1965 Mrs. Edith M. Brickman - Brookline 

1965 Mrs. Carol Offenbach, Melrose 

1966 Mr. Robert Patenaude, North Adams 

1967 Mrs. Mary E. Twomey, Belmont 
1967 Vacancy 



DISTRICT IMMIGRATION AGENTS 

Mr. Andrew W. Ansara - Lawrence Office, 301 Essex Street 

Mr. Daniel J. Donahue - Fall River Office, $1 Franklin Street 

Mr. John A. Mclnnes - Springfield Office, 235 Chestnut Street 

Mr. Edmund B. Meduski - Worcester Office, 7U Front Street 



ANNUAL REPORT 

DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1961* 

The end of the fiscal year, June 30, 1961;, completed the l*7th year of service 
of the Division of Immigration and Americanization, originally established as the 
Bureau of Immigration in 1917, and since 1919 a Division in the Department of 
Education. 

The total services rendered in the five offices were 1*3, UU8, a slight increase 
over the previous year and shows the full capacity of work which a total personnel 
of 17 employees accomplished for 21,1*03 individuals who were served by our five 
offices. Of this total, 11,1*22 came to the Boston Office j Fall River, 1,853; 
Lawrence, 2,121; Springfield, 2,688; and Worcester, 3,319- The Boston Office re- 
ported 2U,998 services with a personnel of 9 workers; Fall River, 3,722; Lawrence, 
$,762; Springfield, 3,715; and Worcester 5,21*7 with two employees in each branch 
office. 



WHAT WE DO 

In classifying and recording the work, the Division uses a basis of services 
rather than a client count. The services may be roughly divided into three general 
categories; i.e., the giving of information on immigration and naturalization 
problems; the filling of the federal forms which are required by the Government for 
immigration and naturalization purposes; and the help given in execution of affi- 
davits of support to bring immigrants to this country. Work with newly arrived immi- 
grants, which usually requires interpretation service, includes help and advice in 
personal problems of adjustment to the new land. 

NATIONALITIES 

Of the 108 nationalities - or places of birth - as we recorded our statistics, 
the Italians were greatest in number - 6,231* (U,035 - Boston). That is the nation- 
ality, the largest foreign speaking group of new immigrants residing in Massachu- 
setts; Canadians numbered 5,581* (Boston - 3,38l). Many were change of status 
assisted, as they had come to the United States on temporary entrance. These 
visitors, or students, were assisted in completing the proper documentation and cor- 
respondence with the United States Consuls in Canada, so that on arrangement of 
appointments with the Consul abroad, they were able to return in a few days with the 
proper permanent resident visa. We list 1*,1*08 persons born in the United States 
(Boston - 2,1*36) for whom we rendered services. Many of these wore sponsors of 
foreign born mates for whom we initiated procedures and assisted in reunion of 
families. Many were sponsors in affidavits of support for relatives from abroad. 
There are also those who, though born in the United States, had lived abroad since 
childhood, married there and had families and now recently returned to the country 
of their birth. Even though native born, they had problems of learning English and 
becoming acclimated to a "new country". 



A notable increase is shown in the number of Cubans - 3,971 services (Boston - 
2,Ul5). The past year showed a marked increase in applications to become legal per- 
manent residents in the United States. We filed documentation at nearby American 
Consuls in Canada and received appointments for them. For many, the hope of return 
to their country of birth is getting more and more remote. 

Of the 3,07U Portuguese born persons, the Fall River Office reported 2,072 
clients, their largest group of the nationalities served. The Southeastern section 
of Massachusetts is still the locale for the majority of Portuguese and Cape Verde 
Island born persons. 

Polish born persons numbered 2,3U3 (Boston - 1,087); Ireland, 1,863 (Boston - 
1,U3U); Greece, 1,706; Germany, 1,U12; England, 1,015; Chinese born, 928; Jamaica, 
627; Lebanon, 598; Lithuania, U60; U.S.S.R., U28; etc., with a goodly number from 
the new countries as Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Libya (see statistical sheet attached). 

RESIDENCE OF APPLICANTS 

The greatest number of services were recorded for the clients who resided in the 
cities where our offices are maintained, although practically every town and city 
of the Commonwealth is represented. The localities in numerical order are: Boston, 
lii,10U; Worcester, 3,2U6; Lawrence, 2,722; Springfield, 2,007; Fall River, 2,003; 
Cambridge, 1,661; Lowell, 1,573; Brookline, 1,023; New Bedford, 1,000; and Somerville 
995; etc. (see statistical sheet attached). 

IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS 

— «... | I ■! I I I I | I M ■■■!!! ■■ I I WJTOHIM II IWh 

Immigration matters of varying kinds ranging from the making of an affidavit 
for the purpose of bringing relatives to the United States to the changing of an 
irregular or temporary status to a legal one on the part of the persons already here 
is a major part of our work. The complexities of the immigration and citizenship 
laws, with the small quotas for the countries where so many of our clients come from 
as Italy, Portugal, Greece, etc., bring the majority of requests for our services. 
Families separated by the quota situation hope for new legislation to remedy their 
plight . 

Family separations are many, as that of the Italian born father who came to 
the United States on the petition of his naturalized daughter. He now faces a 
separation of over three years until his wife and children may join him since they 
are accorded third preference category in the quota, which priority he did establish 
on his petition. Because of the many waiting their turn in this category, he must 
wait. 

A Greek mother of a citizen for whom the petition was approved ten years ago, 
still awaits her turn to come to the United States even though she is in the second 
preference category! ! I The case of a Greek young lady was much publicized in the 
Boston newspapers. She came to the United States to study but she faced deportation 
to Greece because of the unavailability of a quota number. Her Russian born parents 
had come to the United States but were unable, under technicalities of the law, to 



adjust the status of their daughter since she had reached her majority (she was 22) 
and could not benefit on her parents' quota. A solution to her case has been ini- 
tiated by the intercession of a Congressman filing a Private Bill. 

An Italian born nephew, for whom the uncle had made an affidavit and who regis- 
tered at the Consul in Argentina in 19U9, still awaits his turn to come to the 
United States in the non-preference category of the Italian quota. 

An adult daughter of a citizen born in Barbados, awaits her turn to come from 
Bridgetown for ten years. The Jamaican born niece of a citizen of the United States 
has been registered at the Consulate for many years and still her turn has not been 
reached. The quota allocations cause many family separations and problems. Many 
hope for enactment of pending legislation in Congress for a solution in the reunion 
of close relatives. 

A Visa Office Bulletin of the Department of State, January, 19 6h, lists the 
total number of oversubscriptions as 806,1*08 - 630,021 of which are in the nonpre- 
ference category. The following quota areas have pending registrations of 10,000 
or more: 

COUNTRY OVERSUBSCRIBED ANNUAL QUOTA 

Italy 263,57b' 5,666 

Greece 105,233 308 

Poland 68,701 6,1*88 

Portugal 63,293 U38 

Yugoslavia 33,795 9^2 

Turkey 17,180 225 

Israel l5,79U 100 

Spain 15.258 250 

India 15, 081* 100 

Jamaica .11, 55U 100 

Philippines ll,l8U 100 

Hungary 10,119 865 

Rumania 10,063 289 

The records show that we assisted 2,710 persons in execution of affidavits of 
support. Many of these are in behalf of Irish and Canadian born relatives where 
there is no quota problem. The World Fair has been the excuse given in many a 
visitor's affidavit made by relatives of persons visiting them from abroad during 
this World Fair Year. 

We assisted 333 persons to change status to permanent residence while in the 
United States. The majority of them were aliens on temporary status in the United 
States who had married citizens and now wanted to remain in the United States. The 
next in number were persons who came from South America, Argentina, Brazil or Centra] 
America as Costa Rica, Honduras and Panama, who came on temporary status as visitors 
or students and who now wish to remain in the United States. There is no quota 
situation for natives of these countries and such persons were able to comply with 
all the requirements of the immigration law and were able to change status and 
become residents of the United States without returning to their homeland. The 
majority of them were for young adults who, since coming to the United States, had 



become acclimated to making their homes in America and had prospects in most cases, 
of employment. Our Social Workers initiated the procedure by completing the neces- 
sary application, assembling the required documentation, translating the required 
documents as birth, marriage and other records, and attending hearings with them 
before the United States Immigration Service where the application was acted on. Our 
Social Workers accompanied the applicants on 237 change of status hearings. 

However, the former seaman, now resident in the United States and married to a 
native born citizen and, in many cases, father of a United States born child or chil- 
dren, could not adjust by this application under Section 2h$ of the Immigration and 
Nationality Law. He had to go abroad in his application for immigrant visa. After 
much correspondence and presentation of documentation which the Consul required, 
several Greek born, former seamen were able to go to countries nearby and get a 
visa. This was not possible to do in Canada. Several Italian born former seamen 
returned to Italy and, fortunately, were able to return with the proper visas in a 
few months after the preliminary requirements had been prepared by our Social 
Workers . 

For some, even the adjustment to a permanent resident is not possible, either 
by Section 2US - remaining in the United States to complete this procedure - or by 
going abroad, as this group - Americans married to persons who came to the United 
States as Exchange Visitors - adjustment of status under the present regulations of 
the Exchange Program has been impossible in most cases. The proof of "extreme 
hardship" to the citizen spouse or child has been most difficult to show. The citi- 
zen spouse, in several cases, has gone abroad with her spouse to fulfill the two 
year requirement. 

NEWLY ARRIVED MIGRANTS 

Last year showed that 13,571 immigrants came to Massachusetts from abroad. The 
greatest number was from Canada. Information regarding various immigration matters 
shows our largest number of services as we gave information to some 8,237 clients in 
this category. 

The following chart shows the nationalities of immigrants admitted last year to 
Massachusetts - Year ending June 30, 1963: 

Total 13,571 

Canada k,kl8 

United Kingdom l,5l£ 

Italy 1^061 

Ireland .918 

Germany 693 

Poland 502 

All Other U,k6k 



In the past ten years, 108,896 new immigrants have come to Massachusetts. The 
following chart shows the number admitted yearly: 



195U - 


7,901 


1955 - 


8,817 


1956 - 


11,712 


1957 - 


11,260 


1958 - 


10,128 


1959 - 


9,855 


I960 - 


11,953 


1961 - 


12,091 


1962 - 


11,578 


1963 - 


13,571 



We sent 5,2liU letters of welcome to the new immigrants. From 2,835, we -.. 
had requests for services. They came either in answer to our welcome letter or 
referral by a friend. The problems of assimilation are many. Of great concern is 
the matter of learning the language - becoming citizens - as well as where to fulfill 
requirements for the draft, change of address, job opportunities and information for 
opportunities to join social groups of their own nationalities. 

The past year brought emphasis on problems of the "domestic" who had come to 
the United States on employer sponsorship. Many were arranged through professional 
employment agencies. Several were disappointed that the employment was in a town 
distant from the city where they had hoped to follow courses of study at nightj 
others desired to leave their employer because the work was harder than anticipated. 
In some cases, the employer was dissatisfied and wished to have the employee leave . 
and be devoid of his "guarantee" and responsibility. 

IMMIGRATION FROM BEHIND THE IRON CURTAIN 

Inquiries from many clients come to have relatives come from behind the Iron 
Curtain as Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Bulgaria, Rumania, etc. There have been a 
few successful cases among them. We start the procedure in these applications by 
executing a petition in English and in the Russian languages. Then the document is 
duly legalized by the Secretary of State of the Commonwealth and then by the Depart- 
ment of State in Washington, D. C. It is send abroad to the relative in U.S.S.R. to 
apply for the Exit Permit from the proper authorities. Applicants in U.S.S.R. have 
found that several applications had to be made before given the Exit Permits to 
leave. Many never get the Permit. 

One family had to renew the application yearly for five years, but finally, 
this past Summer, a mother, sister and brother were reunited with their sister in 
the vicinity of Boston. The U.S.S.R. officials had permitted them to come from 
Erevan, Armenia, Russia. 

Two elderly mothers from Lithuania came to Massachusetts, one from Estonia 
and a father from Latvia. 



Many of the applications in which we assisted were made for brothers, sisters 
and spouses and which have met with refusals so far. There is always a flood of 
inquiries and hopeful applications when newspaper articles appear of successful 
arrivals as recently a Lithuanian actress in California was happy in having her 
grandmother join her from Lithuania. 

From Hungary, the past year has witnessed the reunion of children in two famil- 
ies with their parents who had tried for some five years previously to have them 
come without success. 



CUBANS 

Of the 180,000 Cubans in the United States, it is estimated there are now about 
ii,000 Cubans living in Massachusetts. We initiated 385 change of status cases last 
year for Cuban persons. The procedure begins by filling the proper registration 
form at Consuls in nearby Canada. Further correspondence, presenting the proper 
documentation and required evidence to comply with all the immigration laws is 
approved before this procedure is completed. Personal documents as birth, marriage 
records, police clearances to accompany applications must have translations attached. 
Some 3U5 translations alone were made from the Spanish for this group. Presently, 
the United States Consuls in Canada have so many applications pending their atten- 
tion that a form letter is sent on receipt of an application. It informs the appli- 
cant that his name has been placed on the Administrative List and some months will 
pass before the Consul can start the processing of the application. Seventy-seven 
such cases were completed for permanent residence in the United States from Canada. 
A number were families of three and four persons. The majority were single, young 
adults; several professional persons and many were of the clerical group who were 
employed by local insurance companies and banks. 

The vicinity of Boston has the largest number of Cuban residents. Many reside 
in the Back Bay Section of Boston with goodly numbers in Arlington, Belmont, Water- 
town, Cambridge and Waltham. Although hope of return to their homeland has not been 
completely abandoned, that possibility appears further and further away for many. 

Now that there is no direct transportation from Cuba, there is no hope for 
relatives to come from there under "waiver" and parolee procedures. A number of 
Cubans have been able to go to Spain. We have assisted relatives to be reunited in 
this group by execution of affidavits of support and correspondence with the consul 
in Spain so that visas were issued and they entered the United States as residents. 

Several families came via Jamaica. Others have been able to get into Mexico 
and are sponsored from there to the United States. There are still many cases of 
children left in Cuba who are unable to come to the United States, and many who hope 
for reunion with their wives left in Cuba. Our Spanish speaking Social Worker is 
concerned with matters for many Cubans who still lack the knowledge of English. 
Noticeably, there is an improvement in knowledge of English now among this group, 
especially those who are in their early twenties. They, in two years time, seem 
to have advanced considerably well. Many who had acquired English have benefited 
by being able to leave their hospital jobs and enter the banking and accounting 
fields. 



NON-CITIZENS IN MASSACHUSETTS 

Massachusetts is the eighth state in number of aliens in the United States 

California - 767,022 

New York - 608,120 

Texas - 2l|6,280 

Illinois - 203, U06 

Florida - 175,hkQ 

New Jersey - 172,331 

Michigan - 135, Ul2 

Massachusetts - 135? 3Ul 

Pennsylvania - 10U 5 5U9 

Ohio - 86,958 
etc. 

In January, 135, 3iil persons reported their address as non-citizens. The 
nationalities were as fellows: 



Canada 


- 


33,671 


Italy 


- 


Hi, 571 


United Kingdom 


- 


10,519 


Poland 


- 


8,678 


Ireland 


- 


6,525 


Germany 


- 


5,335 


U.S.S.R. 


- 


'2,027 


Netherlands 


- 


1,506 


Cuba 


- 


1,173 


Japan 


- 


508 


Mexico 


- 


203 


All other permanent - 


39,U69 


Other than permanent- 


11,156 


MASSACHUSETTS 


FOREIGN BORN 



Foreign stock, as defined by the Census Bureau, is comprised of foreign born 
persons and natives born of foreign, or mixed foreign and native parentage. In the 
United States, one in each five United States residents is of foreign stoc 1 :, accord- 
ing to the I960 census results. In Massachusetts, the so-called "foreign s^ock" is 
hP% of the total population. 

TOTAL POPULATION - MASSACHUSETTS 5, 1U9, 317 

Native born U,572,865 - 88.8$ 

Native parentage 3,091,008 - 60% 

Foreign or mixed parentage 1,1*81,857 - 28.8$ 



Foreign born 576,1x52 - 11.2 



Persons in Massachusetts of "foreign stock" are 2,058,309 or 1*0$ of the total 
population of the state. 



MOTHER TONGUE OF FOREIGN BORN IN MASSACHUSETTS 

For the 576,452 foreign born persons listed in Massachusetts, the mother tongue 
is listed as follows: 



English 


- 187,336 


Italian 


- 84, 848 


French 


- 59,125 


Polish 


- 33,199 


Portuguese 


- 30,929 


Yiddish 


- 26,417 


German 


- 19,517 


Greek 


- 14,467 


Swedish 


- 14,018 


Russian 


- 11,74C 


Lithuanian 


- 11,494 


Finnish 


5,003 


Arabic 


4,080 


Norwegian 


3,192 


Chinese 


3,172 


Spanish 


3,010 


Dutch 


2,218 


Ukranian 


1,955 


Hungarian 


1,760 


Danish 


1,479 


Japanese 


1,147 


Czech 


880 


Slovak 


641 


Rumanian 


510 


Serbo-Croatian 


400 


Slovanian 


57 


All other 


- .16,828 


Not reported 


37,022 


TOTALS 


- 576,452 


NATURALIZATION AND CITIZENSHIP 



We assisted 2,022 persons in becoming citizens and filled applications for 
naturalization. Declarations of Intention were made for 181 persons who found this 
necessary either for employment or to enter military service. 581 persons who were 
citizens through their parents were aided in procedures which sometimes involved cor- 
respondence in getting necessary birth records and evidence of long residence in the 
United States. They found it necessary to apply for Certificates of Cit senship to 
prove citizenship in order to get registered to vote or to obtain United States pass- 
ports for travel or for employment purposes. One applicant, who had been voting for 
many years under the assumption that his father was naturalized during his minority, 
found that when his birth certificate came from abroad, he was over 21 years of age 
at the time of the father's naturalization so that he had no right to vote. He had 
to get naturalized after living in the United States over fifty years. 



The newer immigrants, especially from the Communist Controlled countries, are 
applying for naturalization as soon as possible. There were several elderly appli- 
cants desirous of getting housing in the public housing projects who found it 
necessary to get naturalized in order to qualify. 

We have been able to assist a number of the Philippine born servicemen of the 
United States Coast Guard or Navy Service in getting naturalized. They were those 
persons who had been in service some ten years but who had enlisted in the Philip- 
pines for this service. Regulations provide that on termination of their service, 
they are to leave the United States and are inelig ble for naturalization unless an 
entry as an immigrant is made. For a number of them who had married native born 
girls, we assisted them in obtaining immigrant visas by completing procedures and 
getting appointments for them with consuls in Canada. After their return from Canad 
and now having a recorded entry into the United States and being able to qualify 
with three years or more service in the Armed Forces, they were able to get natu- 
ralized as citizens of the United States. 

For lip. persons, we filled forms to get duplicate naturalization certificates 
which were lost. For persons who derived citizenship, 581 applications were made. 
Election year, with the necessity of voters to produce evidence of citizenship in 
order to register to vote, reminds individuals more forcibly of this need. 

NEW RULING FOR NATURALIZED CITIZENS 

Angelika Schneider, a Massachusetts resident who appealed her case to the 
Supreme Court, won a favorable decision regarding her citizenship which will affect 
some 1^0,000 citizens of the United States. The regulations and manner of procedure 
of restoration of "lost citizenship" is still being worked out by the United States 
Immigration and Naturalization Service and we have had many inquiries about this 
decision. 

On May 18, 196U, the United States Supreme Court, in a far-reaching decision 
in Schneider v. Rusk, declared unconstitutional the provisions of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act expatriating naturalized citizens who have resided continuously 
for three years in their native country. The court, by vote of five to three, with 
one Justice abstaining, found the provision in violation of the due process clause 
of the United States Constitution. 

The impact of the decision, and the number of people affected cannot be estim- 
ated at this time. Not only does it affect naturalized citizens presently living 
abroad, but also the children, and in some cases, the grandchildren of naturalized 
citizens who may have died abroad long ago and who had been found expatriated under 
the provision. If the children were born to American citizens, they derived citi- 
zenship from their parents, and they, in turn may have conferred citizenship upon 
their children. Because of the various changes of United States nationality laws 
over the years, many problems may arise frcm this ruling. 

The appellant, a German national by birth, came to the United States with her 
parents when a small child. She derived United States citizenship at the age of 



sixteen through her mother. During her college years, she studied abroad, became 
engaged and married a German national. Thereafter, she resided in Germany for more 
than three years. She made two visits to the United States. Two of her four chil- 
dren are dual nationals (persons born abroad of parents one of whom is a United 
States citizen who prior to the birth of the child was physically present in the 
United States for not less than ten years, at least five of which were after the age 
of fourteen). The other two children were born after Mrs. Schneider had been 
denied her passport and had been declared expatriated. She sued for a declaratory 
judgment in the District Court for the District of Colombia and that Court held 
against her. The decision was appealed to the United States Supreme Court. The 
Court, in an opinion which for its importance is comparatively brief, found the 
provision unconstitutional. 

PENDING IMMIGRATION LEGISLATION 

No new immigration legislation was enacted last year. Since the enactment of 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, numerous organizations have urged 
changes in the laws. Of special concern has been the revision of the national . 
origins quota system which allocated quotas to countries based on ancestry of the 
population in the United States in 1920. Bills with this objective have been intro- 
duced in every session of Congress. Most of them, however, also contained proposals 
for revision of other aspects in the law, both minor and important. 

No bill with general revision aspects has received so much consideration until 
this year when many bills introduced by single sponsorship and others like S.1932 
sponsored by some 27 Senators, or other bills, introduced in the House of Represen- 
tatives sponsored by over 50 Representatives. Another bill sponsored by the Admin- 
istration received much attention. Hearings by the several Judiciary Committees 
were held and many persons gave testimony both for the bills and some against. The 
Attorney General of the United States, Hie Secretary of State, Secretary of Labor, 
appeared in favor of revision. However, it appears at this time that the possibil- 
ity of enactment of an immigration law revision is very dim this year. 

In general, the proposals are concerned with a gradual elimination of the 
national origin quota system over a period of five years. The National Origins quot' 
system, is: the system under which each country outside the Western Hemisphere has a 
specific number - a quota - of immigrants admitted to the United States yearly. Thi:- 
allocation is given to each country as its proportion of the total - equal to the 
proportion of the white population in the United States in 1920, whose national 
origin was attributed to that particular country. 

Great Britain, for instance, gets 65,361 of the total quota of roughly 157,000 
(of which it usually uses only about hP%) . Poland, on the other hand, get 6,UG0; 
Italy, 5,666; Hungary, 065; and Greece, 308 (all of which have heavily oversubscribe 
quotas ) . 

Under the present law, the minimum quota for any country is 100. Moreover, 
persons of one-half Asian ancestry, unlike all others, regardless of place of birth 
are chargeable to the quota assigned to the Asian area from which they originally 
derived by their Asian ancestry. 



There is no numerical limitation on admission of persons born in the Western 
Hemisphere, except for those from colonies or such former colonies as Jamaica, 
Trinidad and Tobago. The present annual quota is approximately 157,000. 

The major changes proposed in several of the bills are: Abolishment of the 
national origins quota system over a five year^period in the following manner: It 
reduces each quota by 20$ a year; that is, 20$ the first year; hp% the second year; 
60% the third year; 80$ the fourth year, so that by the end of the fifth year there 
are no country quotas. 

The numbers that become available by the annual reduction in quotas plus all 
unused numbers of the prior years go into a quota reserve pool. Numbers within the 
pool are to be allocated on a first come first served basis with priorities for 
persons with skills and close relatives. 

Priorities in the present law prevail with certain exceptions as follows: 
Parents of United States citizens get nonquota status and the preference category 
has added to it (a) parents of aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence and 
(b) qualified quota immigrants capable of performing specified functions for which a 
shortage of capable and willing persons exists in the United States. 

No quota area can receive more than 10$ of the total or l6,£00, except that 
during the first five years no country shall have its present quota reduced by more 
than the annual 20$ authorized. 

Establish minimum quotas of 200 for each quota area instead of 100. This would 
increase to 165,000 the immigrants permitted to enter the United States instead of 
the present l£6,987. 

Extend Western Hemisphere nonquota status to all independent countries as 
Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago. 

Persons entitled to first preference category will no longer have to have 
employment assurances to enter the United States. 

Eliminate discrimination against Asians - repealing the Asian-Pacific Triangle. 

In speaking for the revision of the Immigration Laws, Secretary of Labor, W. 
Willard Wirtz, assured the Committee that the proposed changes would not have an 
adverse effect on the labor market in the United States. He said, among other 
things: "In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the flow of immigrants into the 
United States helped satisfy the labor needs of our developing industries such as 
coal mining, apparel and transportation. In contrast, a greater percentage of 
immigrants entering this country during the past two decades have been professional 
and technical -worker category. Under the present law, approximately 8,600 quota 
immigrants entering the labor market are craftsmen, foremen and kindred workers. 
The Jproposed revision would bring this category up to about 13,800 representing 
about one of every five worker immigrants. We have benefited greatly from the 
diversified education training and knowledge brought here by immigrants. During the 



1952-1961 period, the United States profited when some 1U,000 immigrant physicians 
and surgeons and about 28,000 nurses helped alleviate the shortage of trained 
personnel in the critical medical field. Some U,900 chemists and nearly 1,100 
physicists contributed their technical knowhow to industry and government. Fifteen 
of the United States Nobel prize winners in the field of chemistry and physics were 
foreign-born. More than 12,000 immigrant technicians, the vitally needed men and 
women who assist and support scientists and engineers, were also admitted during the 
1952-1961 period. About 9,000 machinists and 7,000 tool and die makers added their 
skills to our supply of craftsmen." 

Any change in legislation affecting immigrants in this State, with its high 
proportion of foreign born, casts the prospect of the many continued services which 
we shall be called upon to perform. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Cooperation with many private and public social agencies continue to our mutual 
benefit in exchange of special technical information regarding social work problems 
and information on citizenship and immigration procedure. We are fortunate to have 
good relationship and expert assistance from the United States Immigration and 
Naturalization Service Office in Boston. Cooperation with teachers and adult civic 
groups, supervisors and directors, continue. 

Leaders of foreign speaking groups have called on us for assistance and explana- 
tion of immigration and citizenship laws and encouragement towards naturalization. 
The work of the office has been explained before groups and addresses on radio and 
once in a television program. As a member of the National Organization - American 
Immigration and Citizenship Conference - and Social Worker organizations, we parti- 
cipate in their many programs. 

Our booklet, recently revised, "THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES and 
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS IN PREPARATION FOR NATURALIZATION EXAMINATION" received wide 
distribution. Each applicant we assist for citizenship is given a copy. Some 
10,000 copies are distributed yearly to many schools for use in citizenship classes, 
to libraries, as well as to various courts having naturalization hearings, civic 
groups and through all our District Offices. 

We conduct no publicity campaigns and the ever increasing calls for our services 
attests to the fulfillment of the duties of the Division of Immigration and Ameri- 
canization as designated in the law under which the Division operates: 

"The Division of Immigration and Americanization shall employ 
such methods, consistent with law, as in its judgment will 
tend to bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful relations 
the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin, protect 
immigrants from exploitation and abuse, stimulate their 
acquisition and mastery of English, develop their understand- 
ing of American government, institutions and ideals and 
generally promote their assimilation and naturalization." 



PROJECTIONS 

The growth of services given has not been matched by increase in staff in 
this Division. This is particularly evident in the Boston Office where the staff 
of nine, four of whom are social workers, work on the many problems of newcomers, 
immigration and citizenship. Retirement of a social worker two years ago left a 
vacancy which has never been filled and there is intensive need, not only of this 
replacement, but for at least an additional social worker to relieve the tension 
and stress of the demands for services where applicants have to wait sometimes an 
hour for their turn. Our* present difficulty is giving adequate service with an 
inadequate staff. A public office like ours meets difficulties in attempts to limit 
intake . 

The need for our services reflects the changes and tensions which Federal Laws 
make in the pattern of living for those from other lands. Integration of the new- 
comer is still a major personal problem. Difficulties in family reunions, techni- 
calities of residence, immigration and citizenship laws all affect the foreign born 
person. The need for a State Office like ours is most apparent, and its use more 
constant. Education and knowledge of American ideals and principles is most impor- 
tant in the present day world tensions and "cold war" against Communism. 

THE BOARD 

Since its beginning, this Division has had the guidance and assistance of a 
Board of six members who hold business meetings monthly concerning policies and 
functions of the Division of Immigration and Americanization. They serve without 
remuneration. The term of office is three years and two members are appointed 
annually by the Governor of the Commonwealth. 

Through the years, we have had the guidance and concern and interest of many 
dedicated community leaders of many ethnic origins. 

Such a person was Mrs. Clementina Langone who, continuously,,, for over fifteen 
years, gave dedicated service in behalf of so many persons. With a deep feeling 
of loss of her great leadership, her passing away on April 20, 1961; is •memorialized. 

The present Board of the Division of Immigration and Americanization consists 
of the following members: 

Mrs. Gemma Valenti, Medford - Chairman 
Mrs. Edith M. Brickman, Brookline 
Mrs. Carol Offenbach, Melrose 
Mr. Robert Patenaude, North Adams 
Mrs, Mary Twomey, Belmont 



FALL RIVER OFFICE 

A total of 3,722 services to clients was rendered by the Fall River Office 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 196U. This figure represents an increase 
over the previous fiscal year. It also served thirty-three separate localities in 
Southeastern Massachusetts. The report shows an increase of individuals served, 
covering a wide and complex variety of problems. 

The most distressing problem this office must contend with, is the small 
Portuguese quota. Portuguese ethnic clients consist of more than two-thirds of our 
workload due to the influx of Portuguese Nationals who have located in the New 
Bedford area during the past ten or more years. This small Portuguese quota separ- 
ates families coldly and arbitrarily. For years, husbands, wives and little children 
are separated from each other. This problem has worsened in the past two or more 
years and unless Congressional legislation, such as H.R. 12305 or H.R. 7700 is acted 
upon by the 88th Congress, hardships rather than simple humanity will be served. 

The Cuban Refugees who fled from the Castro Regime and entered the United States 
apparently did not, to any degree, locate in the Southeastern Massachusetts area. 
One section in the City of New Bedford has felt an influx of Puerto Ricans and Cape 
Verdian Portuguese Nationals. In this area there are approximately forty-to-fifty 
nuns who have fled Castro's Cuba and have opened convents and schools in New Bedford, 
Fairhaven, Mattapoisett and Provincetown. These schools are attended mainly by 
Puerto Rican Nationals and Cape Verdian Portuguese citizens. 

Many of the nuns are natives of Spain and this constitutes a problem of adjust- 
ing their immigration status through first preference visa petitions and then appli- 
cation for adjustment of their status under Section 2U5 of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act. 

During the past fiscal year, this office completed 833 forms. The majority of 
these applications were citizenship and immigration forms which unite families. New- 
comer letters were sent to hundreds of new immigrants destined to reside within this 
district. These letters welcomed the new immigrant to our Commonwealth and advised 
them of the purpose of our office and the services available to them in adjusting 
their lives in the United States. The response and inquiries concerning these new- 
comer letters was most gratifying. 

During the past fiscal year, this Agent addressed numerous small gatherings in 
the Fall River area. Participation on the "WALE" Radio Program "Sounding Board" was 
for an hour and one half. The interview consisted telling of the work in this 
office in the field of immigration and citizenship. There was a question and answer 
period from local residents via telephone concerning specific problems that they 
desired to have answered. I also spoke before the local chapter of the "I Am An 
American Day Club" and was the principal speaker at the Adult Education graduation 
program in Fall River. 

The Southeastern Massachusetts area office has always had excellent facilities 
for the non-English speaking newcomers. There has been in this area a definite, open 
welcome towards the newcomer on the part of teachers, supervisors and school admini- 
strators to enroll these people in the local classes for English training. 

The Southeastern Massachusetts area is now on the threshhold of a broad and 
bright new future in the field of education with the building of the Southeastern 
Massachusetts Technical College located in Dartmouth, offering excellent opportuni- 
ties for higher learning to the sons and daughters of these newcomers. 



LA'/JRBNCE OFFICE 

The fiscal year I963-6U ended on a note of hope and expectation. Refugees from 
Cuba are looking forward to the day when either their relatives still in Cuba can 
join them or when Cuba will again be free. Immigrants from southern Europe are 
anxiously scanning the daily newspapers, hoping for Congressional action on pending 
legislation to alleviate the immigration laws so they may be reunited with their 
families . 

We in the Lawrence District Office are not merely witness to these hopes and 
frustrations. Rather, we are the motivating factor, since we serve as advisers, 
dispensers of information, representatives, secretaries and sympathetic listeners. 

Although the Cuban crisis of last year has faded, its repercussions are still 
reverberating through our office. Out of necessity, this Agent has even become 
conversant in Spanish! Although "hope springs eternal" in the hearts of many Cubans 
a number of them have become resigned to the fact that they will be in the United 
States for some time. Consequently, the two services most frequently rendered last 
year for the Cuban refugees were first, the preparation of forms and the arrangement 
of appointments with the United States Consuls in Canada for the issuance of immigrc- 
tion visas, and secondly, the completion of affidavits of support to bring to the 
United States relatives who had fled from Cuba to Spain or to Mexico. 

Although Cubans took 22$ of our time, the remaining 78$ involved natives of 
approximately 72 other countries. The predominant subject among these people dealt 
with the immigration quota and its restrictions. Among the many groups seeking 
assistance and advice in immigration matters were officials and foreign students at 
Lowell Technological Institute. This Agent spent one day at the school meeting with 
foreign students and helping them to resolve whatever problems on immigration they 
may have; giving information and assistance because of knowledge of the laws and 
procedures affecting them. 

A gamut of emotions was observed at the Lawrence office last years heartbreak, 
tragedy, joy and humor. There was the heartbreak of continued separation of father 
and married daughter still in Poland due to quota restrictions; there was the 
tragedy of the Greek mother returning alone to Greece after bringing her desperately 
ill son to the Childrens' Hospital in Boston where even the skill of our famed 
surgeons could not save the child's life; there was the joy and pride of admission 
to American citizenship of an elderly woman who has been in the United States for 60 
years and who never had dared apply thinking she had to know how to read and write 
in English until we advised her of the 19!?2 law exempting her; also, there was the 
humor of the handsome, unmarried visitor from Italy who thought we should start a 
matrimonial agency on the side so visitors could stay in this country. 

Citizenship played an important part in the services rendered by our office 
last year. This agent was principal speaker at the graduation exercises of the 
Lawrence English and Americanization classes at Lawrence High School. This Agent 
also participated actively in the naturalization ceremonies held in Lowell and 
attended all the naturalization sessions at the Superior Court in Lawrence. 



All our news releases were graciously publicized by the Lawrence and Lowell 
newspapers and radio stations. A high level of cooperation continued and is contin- 
uing between this office and all the public and private agencies with whom we came 
in contact. Newcomers to this area were welcomed by letter and those who had prob- 
lems not related to immigration or citizenship were referred to the proper resources. 

Last May, this Agent experienced a real thrill. The Cuban refugees in Lawrence 
have formed a Cubans-in-exile club and on May 22, they invited me to attend an affair 
they were holding. I arrived late and the hall was filled. I stood in the back, 
listening to the main speaker, a professor from Merrimack College in North Andover, 
Massachusetts. The president of the club was seated next to the speaker, and as soor 
as he saw me, he arose and whispered something to the professor who stopped his 
speech. Then, pointing to me, the president motioned me to go sit next to him. As 
I started to walk up the aisle, I understood him when he announced in Spanish: "Mr. 
Ansara, representative of the Immigration Office in Lawrence". Immediately, everyone 
in the hall stood and applauded. They continued clapping enthusiastically until I 
reached the front and sat down. I knew they were not applauding me, personally. I 
was a symbol, and this was their way of saying: "Thank you, America." 

SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

In the year ending June 30, 196h, a total of 3,715 recorded services were given 
by the branch office at Springfield. Individuals from h9 localities in the four 
western counties came to us and we had correspondence from 5>U former residents now 
residing in other parts of the United States who came to our community upon their 
arrival in this country. 

Our clients included 5k different nationality groups. French-Canadians led 
this classification with the next largest categories being United States -born 
persons, natives of Italy, Germany and Poland. 

Last year 6£l letters were sent to newly arrived immigrant families destined to 
our district. Responses from them and personal contacts with them were indeed re- 
warding. We have counseled them and aided many to adjust to their new way of life 
in America. All expressed their gratitude at the thought of having an agency such 
as ours to welcome them and to which they can come to obtain the many technical 
services offered to them by this Commonwealth. 

Many of the applicants for naturalization required urgent attention - some be- 
cause of employment and others because they were dependents of Air Force Personnel 
about to go overseas. The majority of certificates of citizenship were made for 
small children born abroad while their fathers were stationed overseas with our 
Armed Forces. 

On July 8, we witnessed the naturalization of a gentleman who was born in 1911 
in a country now classified as one behind the Iron Curtain. He gained considerable 
publicity, internationally, because of his manner of escape from his homeland. He 
first came to our attention in 195? after he was temporarily admitted to this 
country. This office assisted him in obtaining an immigrant visa at Montreal, 
Canada, to enter the United States for permanent residence. At the time of the pre- 
paration of his application for citizenship, he asked the district agent to be one 
of his witnesses. He felt that it would be an honor to be sponsored for citizenship 
by a representative of the agency that did so much for him during the time that he 
has lived in this country. He was greatly disappointed to learn that the agent 
would not qualify. 



Cuban Refugees in our area have sought our aid in becoming permanent residents 
of this country. fe aided them by making the necessary arrangements for them to 
obtain appointments at the American Consulate at Montreal, Canada to obtain immi- 
grant visas. 

One such case concerned a lady and her three small children paroled into the 
United States in 1962. All were born in Cuba. This woman has a husband who was 
born in Lebanon - a resident of .'Cuba for many years and at present resides in Spain. 

Immigration work has been frustrating at times because of the inability of so 
many people to have immediate members of their families join them in the United 
States. Our clients definitely appear to be in a position to financially give these 
people a better way of life here and to relieve them of some of their hardships. We 
have assisted all in preparing, when possible, petitions, affidavits, etc., hoping 
that, in the near future, families abroad may qualify for visas to come to the 
United States. 

It is hoped that the present Congress may give favorable consideration to re- 
vising and modernizing our Immigration Laws which will permit the reuniting of 
families. If it does, we can anticipate an increase in our work of assisting resi- 
dents of our area in executing the required applications to sponsor relatives. 

During the year, publicity was given in our local press concerning activities, 
as well as important information of benefit to the non-citizen. Contacts were made 
with the teachers of Adult Education to whom we refer so many of our new immigrants. 
Additional publicity concerning the duties and functions of the Division as con- 
tained in a bulletin of information prepared by our Supervisor was sent to racial 
groups and agencies not circularized the previous year. 

Attendance at Court for final naturalization hearings lends precedence to the 
function of this agency. 

Excellent cooperation has been manifested throughout the year in our relations 
with other public and private agencies. It is a great source of satisfaction to us 
to learn by these contacts that we are fulfilling the functions required of us under 
the law that established our Agency. We are particularly pleased with the splendid 
cooperation received from the very courteous and efficient personnel in the local 
office of the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service. 

WORCESTER OFFICE 

Worcester County, including the City of Worcester, often referred to as the 
"Heart of the Commonwealth", with only a small airport and no seaport has a number 
of resident foreign stock, approximating the high hQ% average for the state of 
Massachusetts . 

During the year 3,319 individuals came into the office to have $,2kl forms com- 
pleted and services performed, concerning immigration, Americanization and travel. 
These people consist of foreign stock descent, native parentage, and non-immigrants, 
such as visitors, refugee-parolees from Cuba, students, trainees, and exchange 
visitors. 



There has been an increase of persons in the latter group in this area. The 
Cubans move here after living temporarily at Miami,, Florida. We are assisting a 
number of them with visa applications through the United States Consulate General, 
Montreal, Canada. This type of a case has been averaging 6 months to a year for 
completion! lately the Consul has been placing the names on an Administrative Waiting 
List, due to receiving applications faster than they could be processed, which causes 
a further delay and an ncrease in our pending cases. Some of them are employed as 
doctors and dentists in state and public institutions, where their services are 
urgently required. 

It appears that the American Consuls overseas have eased their restrictions on 
issuing visitors visas, consequently inhabitants here are requesting friends and 
relatives to visit them more freely, also to see the New York World's Fair. We 
assist with the necessary Visitor's Affidavit of Support. 

The schools, hospitals and institutions are prone to accept students, trainees 
and exchange visitors. We advise these non- immigrants concerning the procedure to 
apply for extensions of stay and apply for admission or re-admission to the United 
States as immigrants under the first preference under the quota for their country, 
that is, those whose services are determined to be needed in the United States. 
There has been an increasing number of exchange visitor nurses coming frcm the 
Philippines, and student engineers from India. One unusual case involves one of 
these nurses who should leave the United States for two ynars after completing her 
exchange visitor program, but due to "marriage to a Filipino man serving in the United 
States Navy for 17 years, she is being allowed to remain here under "Docket Control", 
and performs her needed services as a. nurse while he is a seaman. 

The world renown Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Shrewsbury, 
Massachusetts, in -the field of' steroid biology, is in the process of expanding. As 
many as 100 scientists and students from other lands spend varying periods at the 
Foundation each year. Most of them call concerning immigration questions, and we 
have assisted some of them with their Applications for Waiver and Adjustment of 
Status. These cases are usually drawn out and quite complicated. Most likely, 
this expansion should require more scientists from other countries, and services from 
our office. 

Finally, Worcester has an International Center with the Rotary providing finan- 
ces, a full-time staff worker and incidental expenses and the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association an office. The District Agent and his wife attended the official 
opening night. It was a colorful affair with many flags 5 numerous international 
visitors in native dress mingled with the public in the full auditorium and two 
Scotsmen played bagpipes at the entrance of the new Y.W.C.A. building. The atten- 
dance shows the community acceptance of people of another ethnic background, and a 
project of this type. Quoting the Executive Director that the following will be 
provided: "A center of hospitality, special parties, dances and teas; opportunities 
for international friends to be entertained in American homes, a teaching program in 
English and other needed subjects, a friendly greeting to first-time international 
visitors and solutions to problems faced by international visitors" . She came into 
our office with some of them and continues to refer others. 

Other measures of public relations by the District Agent were: attending a 
luncheon meeting in the city concerning immigration proposals to revise the national 
origins quota system, appearing on a television show and being re-elected an officer 
in a club. 



The Worcester Jewish Federation sponsored the meeting, with Mrs. Murphy, 
Director of the American Immigration and Citizenship Conference, New York City, 
being the main speaker. Topics discussed were a historical review of the national 
origins system, current congressional and presidential "bills for changes, some of 
the scenes behind the news, the need for revisions, and procedures for interested 
persons to contact congressmen, to show the interest of the public in these propos- 
als. Social, religious, and labor groups were represented here from the Worcester 
and Boston areas. 

This Agent took part in a television program with the Immigration Board and the 
Boston League of Women Voters. Mrs. George S. Tattan, Supervisor of Social Service, 
Massachusetts Department of Education, Division of Immigration and Americanization, 
was the guest speaker on the "Expert Opinion" television show, Boston, Massachusetts 
and then she answered questions regarding Immigration and Citizenship. 

The Agent was re-elected Vice-President of the Monday Evening Club for another 
year, a local organization numbering 180 for persons in public contact work and the 
social field. Agencies they represent not only send their clients to our office, 
but we also have to know the proper agency where to refer ours, in each particular 
situation. 






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STATISTICAL DETAIL 



For the Fiscal Year 7/1/63 - 6/30/6U 



ALL OFFICES 



I. 



II. 



INFORMATION 

1. Booklets, forms, blanks" 

2. Citizenship " 

3* Immigratio n 

U. Travel 

5. Other * — — — 



6279 1770 285-7 3325 2 179 16,1+10 

gTg TO 106 ^91 356 2,738 

Eg &5B 590 950 761 3,3 90 

'3^3 to 1901 129B Bb2 "5,237 



TT3H 195" 



175 777 165 1,270 



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FORMS FILLED 
6. AR-11 " 



5801 



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10 . FS -510 

11. G-28 

12. 1-53 

13. 1-9 
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122 



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1-191 

I-212(Fer. to reenter after Dep.) 

I-2U3(Removal to native country 

I-256A — 

I-290A " 

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16. I-131 

17. I-lliO" 
18. 

19. 
20. 
81. 
22. 

23. 
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25. 
26. 

27. 
28. 

29. 
30. 
31. 

32 . 1-612 (Exch. Student Waiver) 

33. Qther Immig Forms 

N-300 ~~~ 

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N-U01 

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III. EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 2U02 3U9 235 3U9 165 3, £20 

16. Affidavit of Support 2090 122 13ft ". £57 102 2,715" 

U6. Affidavit of Facts |8 8 Uo ' 8 2 96 

1*7. Certificate of Identit y 1+2 2 1 5 5o" 

1+8. U.S.S.R. Exit Permi t 16 - ~~^~ 1 Tf 

1+9. Polish Assurance 10 10 2b" - 56 

50. Bulgarian Affidavit ~ ~~Z I - - 3 

51. Other Notarial J9g &9 gg $li 7° ggg 

IV. OTHER SERVICES 8537 JU83 1213 U60 281+ 10,977 

52. Change of Status (Cards) 633 33 101 21+ 35 826 

53. Appearance at Hearings 207 20 6 3 1 2 37 
5U. Interpretation & TransT 7 1213 lH 98 130 - 1,U£T 

55. Letters 61+81 J66 900 303 21+6 «,"296" 

%+ Othe r 3 50 108 - 2 163 

V. INTERVIE W ■ 1979 287 78 163 328 2,835 

57. Newcomer Interview 1979 2S7 7« 163 328 2,835 

T TA L 2lj,998 3,7225,762 5,21+7 3,715 U3,10tU 






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III. EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 2U02 3U9 235 3h9 Igg 3,520 

U5. Affidavit of Suppor T""" 2090 ~l22 13$ £57 102 2,710" 

U6. Affidavit of Facts 38 8 kO ' 8 2 ~96~ 

U7. Certificate of Identit y U2 - 2 1 5 " 50 

U8. U.S.S.R. Exit Permi t 16 - - 1 17 

k9. Polish Assurance . 10 10 2d - j?o" 

50. Bulgarian AffidavT T 3 — ~"^ " 3 

51. Other Notarial ' , 19$ &9 GS SH 76 ggg 

IV. OTHER SERVTCES__ 8537 U83 1213 U60 28U 10,977 

52. Change of Status (Cards) 633 33 101 2U 35 %26*~ 

53. Appearance at Hearings 207 20 6 3 1 2 37 
5U. Interpretation & Trans. 1213" 1U 90 130 - SBE 

55. Letters ggg ^66 900 303 2U6 tt,296 

56. Other 3 ' £p 10b 1 - 2 163 

V. INTERVIE W 1979 287 78 163 328 2, 835 

57. Newcomer Intervie w I979 287 7« 163 320 2,335 

I Q TA L 2li,998 3,7225,762 5,2U7 3,715 k3Mk 






* ft ■ 



1 >. . 



I - -. 



v n • .< 



. \ 



/ ' 



ALL OFFICES 
7/1/63-6/30/6U 



Boston 



Fall .r.- ,v Spring - 

River Lawrence Worcester field TOTAL 



ETHNIC AND NATIONALITY STATISTICS 



1. 
2. 

3. 
h. 
5- 
6. 

7. 
8. 

9. 

10. 

11. 

12. 
13. 
1U. 
IS. 
16. 

17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
2U. 
25. 
26. 

27. 
28. 

29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
3U. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 

ko. 

111. 
U2. 
U3. 
UU. 
Ii5- 
U6. 
1*7. 
1*8. 

1*9. 

50. 

51. 
52. 



Albania^ 
Algeria* 
Antigua] 
Arabia 



S9 



19 



Argentina 

Armenia (R. or T.) 

Australia ' 

Aus tria 

Bahamas 

Barbados " 

Belgiu m 

Bermuda """""" 

Bolivi a 

Brazil ' 



IE? 



30 



101 



"55T 



■^5" 



61 



Br. Guiana 
Bulgaria 

Canada 

Ceylon 

ChileJ[ 
China"" 






1W 
T 



W 



Colombia 
Costa Rica 
Cuba 
Cyprus """" 



"ScT 



209 



■5HT5" 



C zechoslovakia 

Danzig " 

Denmark 



IK 



Dominican Republic 101 

Ecuador "~ 

Egypt 



5? 



El Salvador 

England " 

Estonia 

Finlan d 

Formosa 

France 

Germany 

Ghana 

Greece 



90 



13 

35 



222 

"558" 



Guatemala 
Haiti 



29 

"855" 



Honduras 
Hong Kong" 
Hungary 
Iceland"" 
India 



IT 

TUT 



92 



12 
"579" 



Indonesia 

Ira n 

Iraq"" 



T 



W 



5k 



Ireland 
Israel 
Italy ' 



test 



33 

U03T 



"35" 



211 



TFT 

T 



15" 



10 



W 



29 



73 



W 



70 



15" 



9 



13 
1ST 



7 



W 



19 



850 



13 



37 

TT 



3 

12817 



3 



67 
If 



HT 



10 



81 
T9F 



W 



3 

"58* 



90 



2 

7 



"o" 

"55" 



"T5" 
"555" 



115 



29 

w 



T 

IB" 



3 

12 



35" 



12 



33 



20 



13 



385" 



355" 



11 

3T 



10 

T 



■w 



"58" 



1U 



10 



10 

12" 



8 



W 



132 
T 



37 



1 



3 

"83" 



1B5" 



291 



205 



ToT 



15" 



26" 



57 



10 

To" 






178 
T 



T8T 



ToBT 



359 



177 



10 



21 



2 

35T 



203 

"US" 



w 



20 



310 



_130 
79 



72 



199 



5T 



10 



92b 

"23T 



"75" 



3,971 



ToT 



59 



137 



155" 



170 



21 



180 1,515" 



"58" 



99 



11 



195" 



TTW 




92 



31 
ToT 



17 



758 
"ST 



72 

IT 



T755J 



7U 
3723F 



\ *1»< . 






•A-* • » • "^ • 






.1 + *■ * 



a • ^1 



V' 



I 



. . . . ., ,. ., , ^ 



Ml 



Fall Spring- 
Boston River Lawrence Worcester field TOTAL 

53. Jamaica 

5U. Japan 
55. Jordan 
56 * Kenya 

57. Korea" 

58 . Latvia" 
$9 . LebanorT 

60 . Liberia" 

61 . Libya 

62 . Lithuania 

63 . Macau 
6k . Malaya" 

65. Malta_ 

66. Mexico" 
6? . Monserrat 

68. Morocco 

69 . Netherlands 

70. New Zealand" 

71. Nicaragua 

72 . Norway 

73. Other Countries 
7ii. Pakistan 

75. Palestine" 

76 . Panama 

77. Peru_ 

78. Philippines 

79. Poland 

80. Portugal^ 

81. Puerto Rico 

82 . Rumania 

83. Saudi Arabia 
81i. Scotland 

85. South Africa" 

86 . Spain 

87 . Sudan" 

88 . Sweden" 

89 . Switzerland 

90. Syria 

91 . Thailand 

92. Trinidad" 

93. Turkey^ 
9U. Ukraine" 

95. U.S.S.R7 

96. United States 

97. Uruguay^ 

98. Venezuela 

99. Vietnam 

100. Wales IJ* 

101. West Indies (Other) "70" 

102. Yugoslavia "£22 g 1 ' ' 1< 

T0TAL W^E~ J7752 F775S 5,^7 3,715 EJTO 




'*«• 



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• 



I ! 



i <\ 



> *i 






'« »<•> W 



- »' • •>• 



., • .' » ' 



,» I '• •» 



.. • it? : "* 

'• i 



Boston 



Fall Spring - 

River Lawrence Worcester field 



TOTAL 



L C ALITIES 



Fiscal Year 7/1/63 - 


6/30/61* 


ALL OFFICES 










Abington 


28 


_ 


^ 


mm 


«. 


28 


Ac£ori 


io 


- 


5 


- 


- 


23 


AcushneT 


3 


12 


- 


- 


- 


15 


Adams 


9 




- 


- 


h 


13 


Agawara 


- 




- 


- 


3« 


3« 


Amesbury 


2 


- 


1 




- 


3 


Amherst 


11 


- 


- 




22 


33 


Andover 


5 


- 


171 


- 


- 


176 


Arlington 


293 


- 




- 


- 


293 


Ashland 


7 




- 


- 


- 


7 


Athol 


U 


- 


IB 


7 


- 


11 


Attiebdro 


5 


Ul 


- 


- 


- 


U6 


Auburn 


11 


- 


- 


110 


- 


121 


Avon 


11 




- 


- 


- 


11 


Ayer 


81 


- 


7 


2 


- 


90 


Barnstable 


12 


28 


— 


„ 


^ 


UO 


Barre 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Bedford 


14-3 


- 


B 


- 


- 


51 


Belchertdvm 


1 




- 


- 


2 


3 


Bellingham 


3« 




4» 


- 


- 


38 


Belmont 


266 




- 


- 


2 


268 


Berkley 


13 




*» 


- 


- 


13 


Beverly 


"S?" 




9 


- 


- 


96 


Biliirica 


UB 




10 ' 


- 


- 


5« 


Blackstori'e 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Blandford 


- 




- 


- 


2 


2 


Bolton 


- 




- 


1 


- 


1 


Boston 


11,03k 




^3 


1U 


3 


1U,10U 


Bourne 


11 


7' 




- 


- 


18' 


Boylsiori 






- 


U2 


- 


U2 


Braintree 


5U 




- 


- 


- 


5k 


Bridgewater 


7 


1 


- 




- 


a 


Brockton 


221 


- 


2 


- 


- 


223 


Brookfield 




- 




■ 21 


- 


27 


Brookline 


1,021 - 


^ 


2 


«. 


m, 


1.023 



Burlington" 



Cambridge 



Canton 



Carlisle 



Ca rver 
Cnarlton 



Chatham 
Chelmsford 
Chelsea 
Chester 



Chesterfield 



Chi 



cope* 



oO" 



1,657 

— W 



i ■ 1 1 ib 



IF 



To" 



io 



291 



1 



60 



1,661 



32 



2 

IF 



"55" 



291 






» # 



;'■- 



w •» -, 



- .. » ^. 



. 



« * ..\ ... 



* 



«...* 



•" " ^ -». 



« •/"/•« 



,. 



,J ,■ , , 






• * • - 



- •* v - 



-• • ■ . wKr-. 



»• •» • 



•""•" ».»•.■•:-«. .,. . .«......, ..». ..„„,.,. 



....... . — 



■v- i« • ..•".: 



Fall Spring- 

Boston River Lawrence Worcester Field TOTAL 



Clinton 


h 


- 


- 


85 


- 


89 


Cohasset 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


ConcofS 


55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


55 


Danvers 


ik 


<■» 


13 


— 


_ 


27 


Dartmouth 


6 


107 






- 


113 


Dedriam 


86 


- 


- 


- 


- 


86 


Deerfield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Dennis 


1 l 


2 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Dightoii 


- 


10 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Dover 


6" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Dracut 


3 


- 


63 


- 


- 


" 66 


Dudley 




- 


- 


99 


- 


99 


tiuxbury 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12" 



East Bridgewater 



Groveland 



5 



East Brookfield - - - it - T" 

East Longmeadow - Z - Uti OT 

Easthampton 6 I 16 22 

Easton '8 - - - - 8 

Edgartown . ^ ' . - U " 

Everett ^10 - - h\0 

Fairhaven 9 70 - - - 79 

Fall River 3" 2,ti00 - ' ' - ; 2,003 

Falmouth 36 J2 - '- - 68 ~ 

Fitchburg """ 16 - - 50 - 66 

Foxborough 17 - - Z - 17 " 

Framingham 17I4. , 7 - 181 

Franklin 34 - - 1U" 

Freetown A 6 



Gardner 11 . - 61t - 75 

Georgetown 1 -' ' i - « 2 

Gloucester 5it - - 5U 

Grafton , Z Z 117 - H7 

Granby . , _ - 20 2"5" 

Great Bar ring ton 2 - Z - 1 "3" 

Greenfield 6 - - " - 3 9 

Grptpn 5"" ' Z . I £" 



Hadley - ^ 12 12_ 

Halifax "" 2 - 2 

kamilton U 6 . . jj.6 

Hampden " . . 1 6 7 

Hanover 9 9 

Hanson k _ . ^ 

Hardwick - it 1 5 

Harvard 2 2 

Harwich 2 2 

Hatfield 17 . . J 7 gg 

Haverhill 23 ; 395 : I 5J9" 



%!• • » •* • , 



... .. / .» 



» «■ r. • .,>■ 



*. ,...».* 



«*. f. 4 |* 



•* * ■ , ' 



,«•'•• *>• .<• 



» ■ *.* » 

V '- 



. «. # . fa ■ ■ . 'i » .. r\< • > • • , - - ... * -i * .*• • 

..« • it. /«.»■*■• f • t 



- r A 



u *. *■** 



.«. i. 



* rtf 



s n ,,»*.,,• 



# v f • 



-I . .<% « ■ 



A - r • » ** 



r * , , '».» 



i *«• «M 



%. . -» * 






* • t ' >" " 



v. ^ 



•H » T.»\. l * • 



■*. 4* 



, >.*» 



Pall Spring- 

Boston River Lawrence Worcester Field TOTAL 



Hingharo 


22 


■w 


^ 




_ 


22 


Holbrook 


53 


- 


Urn 


72 


- 


125 


Holliston 


9 


- 




- 


337 


9 


Holyoke 


6 


- 


- 




3U3 


Hopedale 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Hopkinton 


2 


- 


Mi 


2 

12 


— 


U 


Hudson 


19 


Mi 


S 


36 


Hull 


e>5 


- 


- 


..- 


- 


6$ 


Ipswich 


22 


Mil 


3 


_ m 


^ 


2$ 


Kingston 


1 


mm 


^ 


am 


^ 


1 


Lakeville 


6 


3 




m , 


^ 


9 


Lancaster 


6i 


- 


- 


29 


- 


90 


Lawrence 


22 


6 


269U 


- 


- 


2,722 


Lee 


1" 


— 


- 


- 


h 


5 


Leicester 


- 


- 


- 


V2 


- 


72 


Lenox 


3 


- 


- 


• 


1 


U 


Leominster 


23 


- 


- 


£6 


- 


fa* 


Leverett 


- 


— 


•a 


- 


a 


« 


Lexington 


92 


- 






- 


92 


Lincoln 


19 


- 




- 


- 


19 


Littleton 


31 


- 


S 


- 


- 


36 


Longmeadow 


- 


- 


- 


- 


k$ 


faS 


Lowell 


^ 


- 


1519 


- 


i 


1,573 


Ludlow 


- 




15 ' 


- 


109 


12U 


Lunenburg 


d 


•B 


• 


1 


• 


3 


Lynn 


'" *30 


- 


21 


- 


m, 


1*63 


Lynnfield 


23 


- 


- 




— 


23 


Maiden 


30U 


. 








30ii 


Manchester 


7 


- 






— 


7 


Mansfield 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Marblehead 


6i" 


- 


3 


- 


> 


6fa' 


Marion 


- 


3 


- 


mm 


- 


3 


Marlborough 


30 


- 


- 


18 


- 


56 


warsniieJLa 


dd 


- 


**- 


- 


- 


22 


nasnpee 


i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


na ocapoisett 


- 


21* 


- 


- 


- 


2li 


naynara 


& 


- 


- 


l 


23 


lieaxieict 


9 


- 


- 


— 


9 


neaiorcl 


ii3^ 


_ 


3 




- 


hhl 


Medway '"' 


13 


- 


13 


weirose 
Merrimac 
Methuen 
Midcileborouffh 


10* 
d 
n 
35 — 


— S-A 


32 
330 


■B 


102 

3U 

3ia 


Middleton 

Milford ~ 

Millbury ' ' 

Millis " - 


9 

k — 
18 


X£ 


- 


113 
58 


- 


hi 

9 

117 

76 

111 



' *, - 






k ■ 



< • 



*■>• 









. -. 



1 ■■»• 



*. „. 



'-. 



- 






«'•> 



-»t . 



■'» .. 






"t "X- 



••\- 



'• V.'-. 






V • 1 



»• > 



* '.'.;. 






•4. 



•' r » , 



.■ ! • * 



■>•.,. 



'■' -<• •» . 



1 '" * * 



*lt 



- i * 



*• «- 



•• -« . •. , 






' V 



■v. 



*♦" KM-. . 



' < 



Fall Spring- 

Boston River Lawrence Worcester Field TOTAL 



Milton 


7U 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7U 


Monson 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


10 


Montague 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Monterey 


3 


- 


- 


Mi 


3 


6 


Nahant 


16 




_ 




— 


16 


Nantucfcet 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Natick 


112 


- 


- 


- 


- 


112 


Needham 


75 


- 


- 




- 


75 


New Bedford 


ta 


9& 


- 


1 


- 


1,000 


New Marlborough 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Newbury 


1 


— 


— 


— 


- 


1 



Newburyport 5 - 22 - - 27 

Newton 736 ' - '6 - - 7E2" 

Norfolk " 12 Z Z lT 

North Adams ^ ,90' - 15 109" 

Nortn Attleborough 11 11 - - - 22 

North Brookfield - — 1 - 1 

North Reading 12 ' " -5 2 IT 

Northampton 2 '- 1 2"5 2T 

Northborough - . 30 - 30 

Northbridge . . _ ' 17 IT 

Norton 7 1 , _ . q 

Norwell " g . Z Z J" 

Norwood — njr : : : z inr 



Orange 



Orleans 



Palmer 



Paxton" 



2 



Oxford * : 50 30 



- - 32 32 

1 : z Ii7 - Eg 

Peaboay lj 7 z 2" 1 Z 13^ 

Pembroke *" gg ■ ' , ' _ , 2% 

Pepperell 2 ' ' 8 ' ' ' 10 

Pfetersham ! i _ ' _ " r 



Pittsfield " -5— : : ; ^ w 

Plainileld "" T~ 



- 1 

Plainville o . 1 ■ ', ^ 

Ply mouth " 12 - Z 

Princeton Z -" ' . '' 6 

Provincetown i ' 



12 



2teZ ^76 - 2 - U78 

Randolph 5q _ $ Q 

Raynham ' 7 ->>><< n n 

Reading 3 ^ _ ; .37 

Rehoboth 2 - 9 

Hevere 307 : z : Z 36T 

Rochester 1 _ ' _ _ -. 

Kockland gjj — ~ : ; z Kg" 

Rockport 7 ~ ' ' ? 

Rowley 3 ; _ _ ' _ ^ 

Russell Z Z ' ' - H H 

Rutland . " ol. ->i 

■■ - - 3U - 3u 



" '■ * •, -J . > 



.. -. V r- 



- * • 4 



\ '/ 



■».»• . .„ p.. 



* •* ■• *«• 



■■**** * 



- - . . ( 



*»* , ^ 



**»-*.«. 



• » t 



* ■ ** *** 



•' - • V 



• * a ■% » 



* T 



1 *» ,« .,- 



* • :t 



*t in *«n 



•i" ■ r . 



* ■ * 



i *l 



*» » »«. >•_ 



Fall Spring- 

Boston River Lawrence Worcester field TOTAL 



Salem 


135 


- 


16 


- 


- 


151 


Salisbury 


k 


- 


h 


- 


- 


8 


SandwTcn" 


l 


- 


- 


Ml 


- 


l 


Saugus 


31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31 


Scituate 


lilt 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11U 


Seekonk 


- 


9 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Sharon" 


20 


- 


- 


M» 


- 


20 


Sherborn 


10 


- 


- 


- 


U 


Ik 


Shirley- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Shrewsbury 


- 


- 


- 


213 


- 


213 


Somerset 


- 


113 


- 


- 


- 


113 


Somerville 


992 


3 


- 


- 


- 


W5 


South Hadley 


1 


- 


- 


- 


uu 


US 


Southampton 


1 


- 


- 


- 


9 


10 


Southborbugh 


2 


- 


- 


3 


- 


5 


Southbridge 


17 


- 


- 


113 


- 


130 


Southwick 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


10 


Spencer 


7 


- 


- 


h5 


- 


52 


Springfield 


10 


- 


3 


1 


19b5 


2,007 


Sterling 


- 


- 


- 





- 


b 


Stoneham 


Ul 


- 


- 


- 


- 


ia 


S tough tori 


22 


1 


- 


- 


- 


23 


is tow 


1U 


- 


- 


- 


- 


lii 


Sturbridge 


7 


- 


- 


b- 


- 


15 


Sudbury 


23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


Su"£toh" 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Swampsco"tt 


59 


- 


- 


- 


- 


59 


Swansea 


- 


73 


- 


- 


- 


73 



Taunton 28 L13 - - - lUl 

Templeton 10 . 2 - IT 

Tewksbury 22 10 32 

Topsfield 10 Z Z Z Z Jo" 



Tyngsborough 5" 



Upton _ . 1-1 

Uxbridge 3 Z 9k - 97 

Wakefield 96 - 12 - - 108 

Walpole 92~" T 8 8 - I5ET 

Waltham y& . 1 - 5 ST 

Ware .9 q r 



Wareham ^ 25 - 29 

Watertown 502 - 6 - £o8~ 

Wayland 20 20 

Webster 1 - - l6o - 161 

Wellesley IIS . . llB" 

Wellfleet 10 3 - - 21 

Wenham 1^ Z i^ 

West Boylston " - 50 ^5~ 

West Bridgewater lit - - - HT 

West Brookfield - • , 1^ 3 17 

West Newbury ^ Z ^ 

West Springfield - - , - 102 10? 



Fal1 Spring- 
Boston River Lawrence Worcester field 



Westford ""* 2 

Westminster ' j" 

Weston 7j" 



Weymouth '" H& 



Woburn 55 

Worcester^ 



Wrentnam TO 



Yarmouth 21 



TOTAL 



Westborough 6 - - -50 a 

Westfield Z T — ^ rS r£ 



H 



westport T"" i\ I " 1— —— — 1= 

Westwood ^ - ^~ 



55 



wnitman T 5 = * B6 

Wilbraham ' £ ; -I £i 33 

Williamsburg « 



Wilmington " 20*"" Z S — = « 

Winchendon g ; ^ 

Winchester itH 3 

Winthrop 3JT"- ^ : gg 



BS 



ky - g 3Jgn 1 ?.TS5 

, : : - - 22 



11 



° Ut ° f Stat ^ W - 133 10 S 681, 

T ° TAL 2 ^" 8 3,722 g.762 5.2U7 3,715 to.hhk 









jHUn ■..•■•-..,-•